Urban agriculture and the food commons

A talk by Xolisa Bangani
Ikhaya Garden

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About this talk

Urban agriculture is an opportunity to develop resilience of communities, particularly vulnerable communities, which becomes especially important in times of crises. A primary challenge to the growth of community- and household-scale urban agriculture has been access to land. Even public land is regulated by notions of ownership, leasehold and use that constrain the kind of public benefits of urban agriculture from being realised. How has the pandemic and the response to it by communities highlighted this conflict between the creative responses of people threatened by crisis who want to grow food for themselves and their communities, and the responsibilities of government to comply with legal and regulatory requirements? Are there other ways to imagine a food commons that would resolve this tension and re-landscape the city to mutual benefit?


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Xolisa Bangani

Xolisa Bangani is the founder of a community project called Ikhaya Garden. The project was founded in 2013 in order to encourage young people to enjoy the adventure of gardening with a motto of making gardening cool.

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